News

TLA Commercialization Partners Take On UA Startups

From an original pool of 44 applicants, 12 individuals were selected to serve in one of three roles: entrepreneur-in-residence, executive-in-residence and investor-in-residence.

Ancient Wisdom Boosts Sustainability of Biotech Cotton

Combining computer modeling and field research on cotton pests, a UA-led study suggests that biotechnology and traditional agriculture can be compatible.

Website Shines Light on Renewable Energy Resources

A team from the UA and eight Southwestern electric utility companies has built a pioneering web portal that provides insight into renewable energy sources and how they contribute to the region’s electricity grid.

$20 Million Gift Pushes UA Closer to the Stars

A major donation by Richard F. Caris bolsters the UA's reputation in space science and supports its commitment to the Giant Magellan Telescope, scheduled for completion in 2021 in Chile.

New Genome Research Illuminates Bird, Crocodile Evolution

A massive project has opened doors to understanding the evolution of dinosaurs’ living descendants. The analysis was made possible by a platform powered by the UA's iPlant Collaborative.

Yeast Are First Cells Known to Cure Themselves of Prions

"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" proteins, in aggregate form, play a significant role in diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's.

Arts and Sciences Are Writing a New Love Story Together

Across the UA, abundant examples of a much more supportive relationship can be found through courses, workshops, programs and publications.

The Lord of the Tree Rings

Thomas W. Swetnam, director of the UA's Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Two UA Scientists Give Extra Thought to the Brain

Backed by a new initiative, researchers want to measure neurons' electrical and chemical communication at the same time, which hasn't been done before.

UA Engineering Turns Smartphones Into Eye-Screening Tools

The devices and accompanying software will enable health care providers, particularly in remote areas, to quickly and easily determine if patients are at risk of losing their vision.

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